Info

MetaLearn

MetaLearn helps you learn anything...fast. Whether you’re building a business, learning a language or picking up a sport, you’ll learn the principles and techniques needed to succeed, as well as gaining insights from the thought leaders driving the global learning revolution.
RSS Feed Subscribe in iTunes
MetaLearn
2017
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April


Categories

All Episodes
Archives
Categories
Now displaying: Page 1
Aug 20, 2017

The major problems people face when learning new skills can be broken down into different stages. And the chances are you’ve experienced one or more of them because I certainly have. 

Maybe you keep getting stuck right out of the starting blocks, or lose momentum after a few weeks. Maybe you burn out from doing too much too soon or struggle to fit the skill into your life after you’ve reached a target. 

While methods and techniques are important, a lot of these problems are emotional and psychological and we’ve all experienced them at one point or another. Most of the time, we know what to do, but we just don’t do it! 

After years of teaching hundreds of students as university lecturer and tutor, learning new skills myself and fielding your questions here at MetaLearn, I’ve broken these problems down into 5 stages and identified the solutions to them.

In this short episode, I'm joined by Will Reynolds - writer, videographer and all around MetaLearner. We discuss the 5 major problems including:

1) Not getting started
2) Not getting momentum
3) Burning out and giving up
4) Plateauing and losing interest
5) Integrating skills into your life

So whether you're looking to get over the first hurdle of getting started, want to break through a wall you’ve hit or just want to find a way to comfortably integrate a new skill you’ve learned into your life, this episode has you covered.

Aug 15, 2017

Gabriel Wyner is an author, ex opera singer and the founder of the Fluent Forever language learning method.

After reaching fluency in German and Italian through immersion experiences, Gabe tried to recreate those experiences for others by producing the Fluent Forever system that rapidly builds fluency in short, daily sessions.

After excellent feedback from his audience and the release of a successful book on the method in 2014, Gabe has been refining the system into an app that he’ll be funding on Kickstarter over the course of the next few weeks!

In this conversation we discuss a range of topics including:

- The three pillars of Gabe’s Fluent Forever language learning system
- The process Gabe uses to maintain the languages he speaks
- How learning languages can help you gain a better understanding of yourself

So whether you’re looking to pick up a new language, dive into an immersion experience or gain an insight into the process for building an app, this episode will give you all that and more.

Aug 11, 2017

Virtual reality has the potential to change learning and education immeasurably and so it’s important that we engage critically with the technology to maximise the benefits and minimise the costs.

From engaging with abstract ideas in a more visceral way to giving people immersive experiences that promote behaviour change and the development of soft skills, the potential of VR seems endless.

But while VR has the potential to revolutionise learning and education it’s important we don’t begin to see it as a magic pill that will solve all our problems and take our eye off the most important parts of learning.

In this short episode, I'm joined by Will Reynolds - writer, videographer and all around MetaLearner. We discuss a range of topics including:

- The current state of VR in learning and where it’s likely to go in the coming years
- The disadvantages of VR that we need to guard against
- The potential benefits of using VR to learn motor skills

So whether you're looking to understand more about the potential impact of this revolutionary technology on society or you're curious about how you might be able to apply it to your own learning in the future, this episode will give you all that and more.

Aug 10, 2017

Jo Cruse is the CEO of The Unreasonables, an organisation that delivers leadership programmes to the UK”s top schools. After a stint in communications and political campaigning, she taught Politics and Economics at one of the UK’s top schools, before embarking on a 9 month Macro adventure, interviewing social entrepreneurs from Alaska to Argentina.

When it comes to preparing students for the 21st century, schools and universities are behind the curve – not least because they provide a very structured environment, which leaves young people unprepared for a world that’s becoming more unstructured and chaotic by the day. 

Jo is on a mission to equip young people with the tools they need to thrive and take leadership of their own lives and careers, and she’s someone who practices what she preaches, having made a number big decisions in her career and personal life in recent years. 

In this conversation we discuss a range of topics including: 

- The most important skills that young people need to develop in the 21st century
- The lessons Jo learned about entrepreneurship and herself on her travels
- The tradeoff between social impact and the bottom line in business 

So whether you’re looking to arm yourself for the constantly changing environment of the 21st century, searching for some inspiration to take a new direction in your life or want to build a business with a social impact, this episode will give you everything you need and more.

Aug 3, 2017

Deliberate practice is more than just doing something over and over again – it’s carefully structured and goal directed and consists of repeated striving to reach beyond current performance levels.

Research on neuroplasticity tells us that this type of deliberate practice changes the structure of the brain and allows us to perform at higher levels.

But practicing the right way at the right time is more complex than just doing the thing – because you need to eliminate barriers to practice, prioritise for fast feedback and maintain a balance between quantity and quality.

In this short episode, I'm joined by Will Reynolds - writer, videographer and all around MetaLearner. We discuss a range of topics including:

- How to manage the tradeoff between quantity and quality of practice
- How to reflect on your progress to calibrate accurately
- How to build learning habits so that the process of practicing becomes automatic, allowing you to focus on improving

So whether you're looking to play a new instrument, pick up a new sport or learn to code, this episode will give you the ideas you need to structure your learning and get those crucial hours of high quality work in so that you can make progress faster, more efficiently and more enjoyably.

Aug 1, 2017

Rob Twigger is a bestselling author and adventurer who has written several award winning books on everything from accelerated learning to studying martial arts in Japan to a biography of the River Nile.

The main reasons people consistently fail to learn new skills are never starting, giving up or getting distracted. And all of these suggest that our perception of how hard something is to learn is crucial to our progress.

Rob offers a compelling solution to this problem in his latest book Micromastery, which outlines the process of taking a small skill, doing it well, and using it to experiment and painlessly learn about a new area. So instead of learning to cook, learn how to make the perfect omelette.

By making the learning task small, self-contained and manageable, you can get the quick wins you need to build momentum and make progress. But micromastery is much more than just a learning technique – it’s a new way of looking at the world and learning about yourself, as you’ll discover.

In this conversation we discuss a range of topics including:

- The process of using micromastery to learn new skills quickly and enjoyably

- The difference between the Eastern and Western philosophies of learning

- How to learn about yourself and the world through travel and adventure

 

We also discuss Rob’s experience learning martial arts with the Tokyo Riot police, his expedition across the Great Sand Sea of the Egyptian Sahara and the polymaths who have inspired him the most.

So whether you’re looking to rediscover your curiosity, pick up new skills and have fun along the way or learn how to make the most of your travel experiences, this episode will give you all that and more.

Jul 27, 2017

One of the challenges of learning a new skill is that very often, you don’t know what you don’t know – and if you can't structure your learning or keep making the same mistakes without correcting them your progress will suffer and you may eventually give up.

This where experts come in – because they can help you plan your practice, focus on the right sub skills and accelerate your learning through regular corrective feedback.

But whether you’re looking for an expert online or in person, it can sometimes be a challenge to separate the wheat from the chaff. That’s why you need to know what to look for in an expert and have a good understanding of their teaching and learning process before committing.

In this short episode, I'm joined by Will Reynolds - writer, videographer and all around MetaLearner. We discuss a range of topics including:

- The different types of expert and how to choose the right one for you
- How to get objective feedback so that you can improve
- How to balance your needs for self direction and guidance to accelerate your learning

So whether you're looking to hire coach to help you learn a new skill, or just want to improve how you learn from an existing teacher, this episode will give you all that and more.

Jul 26, 2017

Julian Baggini is a philosopher and author who has written and co-authored almost twenty philosophical books written for a general audience. He is also co-founder of The Philosophers' Magazine and the blog Microphilosophy.

We’re living in an age where we seem to be losing our capacity to reason - to think rationally and make good decisions, whether it’s in education, politics or the discussion of important social issues.

In his recent work on rationality, Julian argues that many of these problems come from our inability to define reason and understand it properly.

Most notably he argues that reason is not a pure thoroughbred as the Greek philosopher Plato described it – but more of a hard working mule that’s independent from emotions and other drives.

In this conversation we discuss a range of topics including:

- How to become more aware of your own thinking in the different areas of life
- Julian’s discussion of educational philosophy and his answer to the question “What’s the point of school?”
- How to develop reasoning and critical thinking skills to make better decisions

So whether you’re looking to make more rational decisions in your life, become more aware of your own thinking or just want to gain a better understanding of the world we’re living in at the moment, this episode will give you all that and more.

Jul 21, 2017

We’ve all probably had glimpses of great teamwork in our own lives, where every one’s strengths complement each other and compensate for individual weaknesses, but these are often fleeting and temporary.

But examples of these learning experiences are few and far between in most schools and universities and in the organisations that many work in after finishing their education.

Collaborative learning skills must be continuously refined and practiced, not just things that people write about on their CVs and talk about in job interviews – because they can have a massive impact.

In this short episode, I'm joined by Will Reynolds - writer, videographer and all around MetaLearner. We discuss a range of topics including:

- The benefits of collaboration in learning and how to use it effectively
- The difference between dialogue and discussion and how to use both
- How to find a balance between competition and effective teamwork within groups

So whether you're looking to use collaborative learning to pick up a new skill or just want to work better in teams, this episode will give you everything you need and more.

Jul 18, 2017

Ulrich Boser is a bestselling author and senior fellow at the Centre for American Progress. Ulrich recently released Learn Better, a book on the science of learning designed to help you master the skills for success in life, business, and school - and become an expert in anything. 

Ulrich has interviewed some of the greatest minds in the field of learning science, including many of the guests on the MetaLearn Podcast and has thought deeply about the fundamental principles of learning how to learn, giving him a unique take on the field. In this conversation we discuss a range of topics including: 

- The most important MetaLearning principles Ulrich discovered in his research for the book
- How Ulrich has applied learning science to upgrade his basketball skills
- The importance of trust in learning and education and how to develop it 

So whether you’re looking to upgrade your learning skills, gain insights from one of the thought leaders in the field of learning to learn or understand how to leverage trust in your learning, this episode will give you all that and more.

Jul 18, 2017

Ulrich Boser is a bestselling author and senior fellow at the Centre for American Progress. Ulrich recently released Learn Better, a book on the science of learning designed to help you master the skills for success in life, business, and school - and become an expert in anything. 

Ulrich has interviewed some of the greatest minds in the field of learning science, including many of the guests on the MetaLearn Podcast and has thought deeply about the fundamental principles of learning how to learn, giving him a unique take on the field. In this conversation we discuss a range of topics including: 

- The most important MetaLearning principles Ulrich discovered in his research for the book
- How Ulrich has applied learning science to upgrade his basketball skills
- The importance of trust in learning and education and how to develop it 

So whether you’re looking to upgrade your learning skills, gain insights from one of the thought leaders in the field of learning to learn or understand how to leverage trust in your learning, this episode will give you all that and more.

Jul 13, 2017

Our natural instinct to compete with others can be a powerful motivator for learning. As someone who's naturally competitive, using competition has definitely worked well for me in the early stages of learning a new skill and if you're wired in a similar way I'll be surprised if it hasn’t worked for you too.

But anything in excess is its opposite and being overly competitive can also harm your ability to learn if you don’t manage it properly. It’s easy to focus too much on the competition and not enough on yourself.

The truth is there will always be people who are better than us and we need to accept that. If we can, then we can allow ourselves to celebrate others’ achievements and use them as inspiration for pursuing our own.

In this short episode, I'm joined by Will Reynolds - writer, videographer and all around MetaLearner. We discuss a range of topics including:

- The benefits of competition in learning and how to use it constructively
- How competition can harm learning if it’s not kept in check
- How to compete with yourself over an extended period of time

So whether you're looking to use competition to start learning a new skill or just want to try competing with yourself for a while, this episode will give you everything you need and more.

Jul 11, 2017

Mads Holmen is the CEO of Bibblio, an API platform helping knowledge publishers and learning platforms deliver smarter content recommendation.  Bibblio’s clients include the likes of the University of Cambridge and Oxford University Press as well as the BBC and YouTube.

As Herbert Simon said, an information-rich leads to “a scarcity of what information consumes - attention.” We’re currently living in a world where there is a continuous battle for our attention online and this manifests itself in everything from addictive games to fake news, which fundamentally affects our learning and lives.

Mads is someone who has thought very deeply about the ideas behind online media and has a great understanding of the algorithms and business models driving the attention economy, which makes him the perfect guest to discuss these issues with, both from an theoretical and practical perspective. In this conversation we discuss a range of topics including:

- The systems driving the attention economy and how to live and learn in a world full of distractions
- The structural problems that drive fake news and how to spot and deal with this online
- The fundamentals of AI and Machine Learning, explained in a way that a 5 year old could understand

This episode is like a crash course in digital literacy - so whether you’re looking to understand the structure of the attention economy, manage your time better online or get a deeper understanding of AI and Machine Learning, this episode will give you all that and more.

Jul 6, 2017

We all want to be perfect at anything we learn but these expectations of excellence are often unhelpful and more often than not they leave us in a state of paralysis. 

Very often, the reason we don’t act on our desire to build that business, learn that language or master that new sport is because when we get started, we’re not going to be very good and this will quickly shatter that illusion of perfection that we’ve fantasised about so vividly.

In this short episode, I'm joined by Will Reynolds - writer, videographer and all around MetaLearner. We discuss a range of topics including:

- Why perfectionism hurts learning, and the rare exception where it helps
- The difference between having high general expectations and low specific expectations
- Simple strategies to overcome perfectionism and keep making progress

So whether you're looking to overcome perfectionism and start learning that new skill or fine tune your balance between over ambition and slacking, this episode will give you everything you need and more.

Jul 4, 2017

Kevin Kelly is the co-founder and executive editor at Wired magazine, and one of the world’s leading technologists. He’s the author of several bestselling books on technology, including his most recent work, The Inevitable, which outlines the 12 technological forces shaping the future.

As the writer William Gibson once said, “the future is here, it’s just not evenly distributed yet” and in the coming decades, technological progress will transform all aspects of our society, including the way we learn. 

So it’s in our interests to understand the dominant trends and prepare ourselves for what’s to come so that we can ride the wave rather than be crushed by it.

As a leading technologist and the co-founder of the world’s leading technology publication, Kevin is right at the cutting edge of progress, and is perfectly placed to shed light on the core issues driving the global learning revolution.

In this conversation we discuss a range of topics including:

- How to build the learning superpowers needed to thrive in the 21st century
- The technological forces shaping the future of learning and education, including Augmented Reality (AR), Virtual Reality (VR) and Artificial Intelligence (AI)
- Kevin’s insights on skill acquisition developed over a lifetime learning

You’ll also hear about Kevin’s formative experiences from dropping out of college to backpacking around Asia, as well as his current learning projects and a series of unconventional beliefs that most people would disagree with him on. 

So whether you’re a tech enthusiast looking to broaden their thinking in the space or a technophobe who wants to familiarise themselves with the forces that will transform all aspects of learning and education, this episode has you covered.

Jun 30, 2017

In Western society, many of us have now accepted the belief that productivity and efficiency are the foundations for success and happiness. While having some systems in place is important to reduce stress, the truth is that many of us stray towards the other extreme by trying to control everything about our environments and ourselves.

Not only does this obsession with control reduce the quality of our learning and daily experience, it can also harm the creative process by getting us stuck in fixed routines that prevent us from pursuing novel experiences.

In this short episode, Will Reynolds, writer, videographer and all around MetaLearner, joins me to discuss a range of topics including:

- The problems with worshipping at the altar of productivity
- The importance of constraints for the creative process
- Why productivity and creativity are not always competing forces and how to balance them

So whether you're curious about about productivity techniques, want to learn more about the creative process or want to find a way to balance these forces in your life, this episode will give you all that and much more.

Jun 27, 2017

Nelson Dellis is a 4x US Memory Champion and one of the leading memory experts in the world. He’s also the Founder of Climb For Memory, a non-profit charity that aims to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer's research through mountain climbs around the world.

Memory is a critical part of learning anything but we’re never taught how to use it properly. In fact, many people simply assume they have a bad memory when the truth is that all of us have the capacity to remember astounding amounts of information.

Nelson is a perfect example of someone who started out with an average memory like the rest of us and trained himself into one of the world’s leading memory athletes through consistent deliberate practice.

In this conversation we discuss a range of topics including:

- The techniques Nelson and all competitive memory athletes to memorise everything from names and faces, to decks of cards
- The importance of regular mental training for mental health
- The life lessons Nelson has learned from mountain climbing

You’ll also learn what it’s like to climb Everest and Kilimanjaro, compete at the World Memory Championships and memorise 200 names in 15 minutes. So whether you’re a beginner just looking to remember more names at work, or want to memorise huge quantities of information, this episode will give the principles and techniques needed to succeed.

Jun 22, 2017

"What's the point of school?" is a question that’s been asked for hundreds of years. It’s a question that some of history’s greatest thinkers have spent their entire lives trying to answer.  

But we still don’t seem to have an answer that most people would agree with. If anything, the debate about what should be going on in schools and universities is getting fiercer with every year that passes.

In this short episode, Will Reynolds, writer, videographer and all around MetaLearner, joins me to discuss a range of topics including:

- The difference between learning and education and why it matters
- The harmful mindsets that education instils in us and how to combat them
- How the method of teaching has evolved in schools across history

So whether you're curious about the effects that the educational system has on us or just want to learn more about what some of history’s greatest thinkers have contributed to the debate, this episode will give you all that and much more.

Jun 20, 2017

Will Reynolds is a videographer, writer and all around MetaLearner who has become a regular fixture on the MetaLearn podcast in our weekly short form conversations on learning and skill acquisition. 

We’re currently living in a world where it’s possible to learn almost any skill given the resources we have available for almost no cost. But taking advantage of these resources, learning hard skills and making a living from them is not without its challenges. 

Will is a perfect example of an autodidact who has taken control of his own learning and taught himself skills, including writing and videography, that he now earns a living from. 

In this conversation, we discuss a range of topics including:

- How to go from novice to getting paid for new skills like videography
- The importance of cultivating transferable MetaSkills
- The lessons we can learn from autodidacts like Eminem and Frank Zappa 

So whether you’re looking to pick up hard skills and get paid for them, upgrade your transferable toolkit or navigate the challenges of being an autodidact, this episode will give you all that and much more.

Jun 15, 2017

Technology is changing the way we learn. Gamified learning apps, live webinars and online degrees are now an increasingly common part of the learning landscape and personalised learning systems are already being tested in classrooms.

This shift has brought some fresh thinking to a field that’s been desperately in need of it. But because of this, many have framed digital tech as a magic pill that will solve all our educational problems, without considering its drawbacks.

That’s why I believe we all need to think more critically about how we interact with digital technology on a daily basis, because the secret to learning well with it is not related to which devices we use, but to how we use them.

In this short episode, I'm joined by Will Reynolds - writer, videographer and all around MetaLearner. We discuss a range of topics including:

- The best ways to filter information online to get to the good stuff quicker
- The importance of working diversity into your content consumption
- How to protect your precious attention in the digital economy

So whether you're looking to leverage technology more effectively in your learning, filter content more efficiently or stay focused in a world full of distractions, this episode will give you all that and more.

Jun 13, 2017

Uri Bram is the bestselling author of Thinking Statistically, a book that explains the essential concepts in the field in a clear and simple way. He also consults for major international organisations, and speaks at businesses and non-profits about using data and statistical thinking effectively in the real world. 

In a world that’s becoming increasingly driven by big data, understanding statistics is becoming increasingly valuable. But even if you don’t want to become a data scientist, understanding statistics can help you avoid common thinking mistakes and make better decisions in your everyday life.

Uri is someone with a remarkable ability to explain complex ideas in a simple, entertaining way with wit and flair – and he’s not only done this with statistics, but a range of other disciplines including music, game theory and writing.

In this conversation we discuss a range of topics including:

- The key statistical principals that everyone should be aware of
- Whether understanding musical principles makes you a better musician
- How to learn complex skills from experts

You’ll also learn how big data is like teenage sex, why Mark Zuckerberg and Bill Gates are bad models for success and why eating ice cream doesn’t necessarily increase your chance of drowning in the summer! 

So whether you’re math-phobic and looking to gain a basic understanding of statistics, or already consider yourself a data maverick this conversation will give you a whole range of useful insights that you can take away and apply to your own life.

Jun 8, 2017

Anyone can learn another language - regardless of how old they are, where they live or where they work. But the thing that holds most people back is a series of limiting beliefs, which mean that they rarely end up getting started or get demoralised so quickly when they do that they give up within a few weeks!

That's why it's so important to unlearn a lot of the ideas that we absorb from the world around us - especially when they're ones that stop us from making progress in the thing we want to learn!

In this short episode, I'm joined by my friend Will Reynolds - writer, videographer and all around MetaLearner. We discuss a range of topics including:

- Whether there is a "language learning gene" that most great polyglots have
- Whether immersion is important for the language learning process
- Whether children are actually better language learners than adults

So whether you're looking to learn your first foreign language, or have learned one or two and feel that it's not your strong suit, this episode will eliminate any doubts you have about your abilities and give you the tools needed to make real, tangible progress.

Jun 6, 2017

Gabriele Oettingen is a Professor of Psychology at New York University and the University of Hamburg and a bestselling author. Her research focuses on human motivation and goal setting, exploring the impact of the way we look at the future on our emotions and behaviour.

We’re living in an age where positive thinking is all the rage – from pop music to political speeches thee message is the same: think positive, focus on your dreams and they’ll come true before you know it. The problem with following this advice is not only that it’s empty and hard to action – but that it can actually reduce your chances of achieving your goals.

Gabriele Oettingen has spent twenty years researching the science of human motivation and discovered time and again that conventional positive thinking falls short. By changing the way we think about the future her research has proven that we can become healthier, improve our personal relationships and perform better at work.

In this conversation we discuss a range of topics including:

- How people normally set goals and what they’re doing wrong
- The pitfalls of positive thinking and how to avoid them
- The practical tools you can apply to get better results in your life

So whether you’re looking to make some major changes in your life or just level up that extra one per cent, you’ll learn the practical strategies needed to change your mindset and habits in order to achieve your goals.

Jun 1, 2017

If you’re someone with multiple interests, you’ve probably been branded a “Jack of all Trades, Master of None” more times than you can remember. And those of us with many interests sometimes struggle because we can’t be put into a box and labelled as an expert in a specific field.

But during the Renaissance, a polymath was seen as a perfected individual, someone who had mastered intellectual, artistic and physical pursuits. Hence the term “Renaissance Man” that’s still often used to describe people with multiple interests to this day.

In this short episode, I'm joined by my friend Will Reynolds, who is a perfect example of a polymath and MetaLearner because he’s taught himself a whole range of skills including writing, playing the guitar and videography – and importantly he’s been able to make a living from these skills.

We discuss a range of topics including:

- The lessons we can learn from great polymaths like Leonardo Da Vinci, Benjamin Franklin and Johann Goethe
- Where society's obsession with specialisation comes from and how to deal with it
- How to balance exploring different fields with focusing on getting things done

So whether you're looking to balance your multiple interests, make progress on your learning projects or learn from the great polymaths of history, this episode will give you all that and much more.

May 30, 2017

Ellen Langer is a Harvard psychologist widely known as the “mother of mindfulness” and is the author of eleven books and more than two hundred research articles on mindfulness over the last 35 years.

Mindfulness is becoming more and more of a buzzword these days but very few people actually understand it and even fewer know how to apply it in their everyday lives. But there are few things that can have a bigger impact on your learning and life than improving your awareness of yourself and the world around you.

Ellen is the perfect guide to the field of mindfulness because she takes a clear, no nonsense approach, devoid of the mysticism that often surrounds it. This makes her ideas easy to digest and more importantly, easy to apply in practice.

In this conversation we discuss a range of topics including:

- What mindfulness actually is and how it differs from mindlessness
- Some of the most common learning myths and how to combat them
- How to keep learning fun and avoid it becoming a chore

So whether you're looking to finally understand mindfulness, uncover some of the learning myths that we're vulnerable to at school or improve your awareness of your own learning, this episode will give you all that and more.

1 2 3 4 Next »